HR Articles

The Court of Appeal (“CoA”) has confirmed that the decision to raise the state pension age for women, to match that of men, does not amount to unlawful discrimination, under either EU law or the Human Rights Convention.

State pension age increase not indirect discrimination

18

Sep

2020

State pension age increase not indirect discrimination

The Court of Appeal (“CoA”) has confirmed that the decision to raise the state pension age for women, to match that of men, does not amount to unlawful discrimination, under either EU law or the Human Rights Convention.

To date, under the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme the Government has paid £35 billion to employers to cover furlough payments.

The scale of errors and fraud in the furlough scheme

18

Sep

2020

The scale of errors and fraud in the furlough scheme

To date, under the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme the Government has paid £35 billion to employers to cover furlough payments.

In the recent case of Aramark (UK) Limited v Fernades, the EAT held that it was not  unreasonable for an employer to decide not to include the Claimant on a list of bank workers in a redundancy situation.

Redundancy - reasonableness is judged on whether dismissal could be avoided

18

Sep

2020

Redundancy - reasonableness is judged on whether dismissal could be avoided

In the recent case of Aramark (UK) Limited v Fernades, the EAT held that it was not  unreasonable for an employer to decide not to include the Claimant on a list of bank workers in a redundancy situation.

In the case of Kelly v PGA, the EAT held that an employment tribunal was wrong to make an order of re-engagement as the employer had lost trust and confidence in an employee’s ability to carry out his role, and this belief was rationally held.

Re-Engagement may not be suitable if employer has lost trust in employee’s abilities

3

Sep

2020

Re-Engagement may not be suitable if employer has lost trust in employee’s abilities

In the case of Kelly v PGA, the EAT held that an employment tribunal was wrong to make an order of re-engagement as the employer had lost trust and confidence in an employee’s ability to carry out his role, and this belief was rationally held.

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